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Some of the Lakeshore campus mentors and mentees in the First Year Experience program. Mentors help college newcomers adjust to campus life.

PHOTO BY DONNA MARIE SEVILLA
Some of the Lakeshore campus mentors and mentees in the First Year Experience program. Mentors help college newcomers adjust to campus life.

By Donna Marie Sevilla
Health Reporter

The Humber mentorship program which launched at Lakeshore campus last year has now arrived at North campus.

Over 900 students have signed up for the First Year Experience at both campuses.  The program mentors help new students adjust to campus life, assist with studies and act as a friend when needed.

Paul Wutjow, a third-year public relations student who was key in the creation of the FYE program at Lakeshore, said the program was made for first year students who were having a hard time transitioning into the college life.

“A mentor is to help you with anything, so it’s anything to do within Humber. Like, where is the building… or if you’re having an issue with a professor and you don’t know who to talk to,” said Wutjow.

A study conducted last year compared the grades of mentees with students not participating in the program, showing an increase in GPA in those who had interacted with mentors.

“The peer mentors are volunteers – they’re not getting paid to be here, which really speaks a lot to you about their character and what they’re willing to give back to the Humber community,” said Amber O’Connor, coordinator of student life at Lakeshore campus

Aside from academic help, the program also hosts events that give the students a chance to meet their mentors and fellow mentees.

One of the first events was a carnival themed mix and mingle open house that took place on Sept. 26.

Frank De Leeuw, 22, a first-year student in the teaching English as a second language program said the events help become involved in the Humber student life.

“It’s great – there’s lots of different events. I had to sign up for it because it’s a good way to interact and get to know people,” said De Leeuw.

Regina Valiakhmetova, second-year business administration student, said that she was one of the 200 mentees that signed up with the program last fall.

“I’m an international student and last year, I was a part of the FYE program as a mentee. I had an amazing mentor and that’s why I’m here.

“I want to be on the other side of the program, to help new students adapt,” said Valiakhmetova.

To become a peer mentor, students are required to have a minimum average of 75 per cent, knowledge of school services and to be passionate about helping other students.

To read the original article, visit Humber Et Cetera online: Mentors leading first-year students

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